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Show Your School Spirit With Your Team Colors!

Picture Perfect School Spirit Debit Card

 

Show your school spirit by choosing your team colors. You can even find cards designed especially for these schools!

  • Alburnett
  • City High School
  • Clear Creek Amana
  • Heritage Christian
  • Highland
  • IMS
  • Keota
  • Lisbon
  • Lone Tree
  • Marion
  • Mid-Prairie
  • Mount Mercy
  • Mount Vernon
  • North Linn
  • Regina
  • Solon
  • Washington, Iowa 
  • West Branch
  • West High School
  • West Liberty
  • Xavier

 

Hills Bank
Savings Plan for Kids

Hills Bank Savings Plan for Kids
Visit the Hills Bank Savings Plan for Kids page and learn to Save, Spend and Share for Life, or bring this coupon into any Hills Bank® location for your free booklet.
Offer good while supplies last.

Penny Savers & GO!

Join the Penny Savers Club (designed for children up to the age of 12) or GO! (designed for children 12 - 18) and be a star saver! 

School Years

The "real world" is full of real choices...these are the years to help you get ready.

Getting Started.  Learn to manage money and prepare for the cost of higher education, save for a new vehicle and save for whatever your future might bring!

As a student, you are simultaneously at the end of a long journey and the beginning of an even longer one. You are basking in your accomplishments and looking ahead with wonder. Everyone has a unique life story, and each chapter of that story is accompanied by different financial needs. As your community bank, Hills Bank would like to be a part of each stage of your life and help you with the financial products and services you will need along the way.

You are building the base of your financial future. It’s time to establish great savings habits and manage any debt accrued in school. These products will help:

Saving and Spending

Borrowing

Keeping You Covered

  • Renters' Insurance
  • Auto Insurance
    Insurance products including annuities are not a deposit, not FDIC insured, not insured by any federal government agency, not guaranteed by the bank, may go down in value.

Near Future

  • Mortgage
  • Homeowners' Insurance
    Insurance products are not a deposit, not FDIC insured, not insured by any federal government agency, carry no bank guarantee, and may go down in value.

Convenience


 

Become a “Star Saver”

Saving money in your pre-teen, teenage, and college years is an excellent habit that will prepare you to be a good money manager for the rest of your life. Set goals for your money and start saving now. If you have no immediate goals, your goal can be to have a “money cushion” for when that important need for cash occurs. 

Hills Bank offers savings accounts specifically designed for students:

  • Penny Savers Savings – kids up to 12 years of age.
  • GO! Savings – youth 18 years and younger
    When you are 18, you may open a savings account on your own, either online or at the bank. Younger students may open checking accounts with the co-signature of a parent or legal guardian, and you need to do this together at the bank.
  • College$aver CDs – Saving for college is easier than ever with the Hills Bank College$aver Certificate of Deposit. The College$aver CD offers the convenience of a savings account and the earning power of a certificate of deposit. 

Hills Bank Savings Plan for Kids – Visit the Hills Bank Savings Plan for Kids, your guide to Save, Spend and Share for Life! You will find easy tools, tips, and conversation starters to help understand money and finance. You can also download this coupon for a free Hills Bank Savings Plan booklet to redeem at any Hills Bank location. Your adventures in the world of money start here! 

Learn to Manage a Checking Account – A checking account provides a means to learn how to responsibly handle cash, make smart financial decisions, and keep track of your spending records. Whether you use a debit card or paper checks, your checking account can help you manage your budget, including paying your bills on time and balancing your account. With these habits, you can start building a good credit reputation now. 

Banking 101 – Practice managing a checking account by downloading the Banking 101 packet. Learn how to write checks, record transactions, balance your account, and more! 


Gain money-related expertise through youth groups

National youth organizations not only teach traditional skills, but also offer education about money.

Some organizations you could join are:

  • Girl Scouts of the USA: Junior Girl Scouts can earn a "Money Sense" badge.
  • Boy Scouts of America: Offers a "Personal Management Merit Badge" with the partnership of the National Endowment for Financial Education.
  • 4-H Club: A national organization that offers "Financial Champions" to its six million youths and adults that participate in 4-H.

Ask your family about money and finances

Learn valuable life lessons from older relatives and friends when you ask them about earning, spending, saving, and investing money.  Your history is one of your greatest assets.  Take time to learn from others' challenges and successes. 

To find out more visit Yes, You Can, an online resource designed to help make a positive impact on financial behavior.


Read and explore your local library

Hills Bank has supported Summer Reading Programs for over 20 years. We encourage you to read and explore at your local library because you can't have financial literacy without literacy. Your local library offers fun events year round for all ages!

Hills Bank annually participates in numerous programs through local schools and community organizations, including offering sponsorships, and taking an active role in the education process. Hills Bank provides staff and financial support for summer reading programs in many communities, encouraging youth to read and explore their local libraries.


Get involved in extracurricular activities

There are many reasons to get involved in your community's extracurricular activites. It feels good to connect with others who have similar interests, especially if you are helping others in need. It strengthens the community we live in, and it can strengthen the bond between your family. 

Get involved in your community by volunteering. Volunteering isn't just about doing good for others, it also does good for you. You will have a sense of responsibility and the satisfaction of an important job well done. Volunteering will teach you sacrifice and tolerance for those less fortunate. It's also a great way to build a foundation for the future when looking for scholarships, grants, and eventually a career. One person truly can make a difference. Find ways to give back to your community on the Live Local page of hillsbank.com. 

Get involved in your community through clubs and organizations. If you are not involved with traditional after-school activities, clubs and organizations outside of school can be a wonderful alternative to get involved with others who have the same interests. The Cedar Rapids/Iowa City Corridor has many youth camps and summer camps available. Do an online search and find one that would interest you. You never know who you may meet, it could be a life-long friend! Visit hillsbanklivelocal.com to explore potential hobbies such as biking/hiking trails, community clubs and recreational leagues, and start expanding your social reach with family and friends. 


Area high school activities

Back to school shopping

Most teachers will supply students and parents with a list of back to school supplies, but you can start getting organized, stocking up on basics, and looking for sales and promotions year round. Don't forget to take advantage of back-to-school sales and the "tax-free" holiday in August.

Elementary Students
Writing Utensils Organizational Utensils Craft Materials
  • Ballpoint pens
  • Classic No. 2 pencils (Many times the fancy ones are not No. 2 and the erasers don't work as well.) 
  • Colored pencils
  • Crayons (16 pack for younger children, more for older)
  • Large pink eraser
  • Pencil sharpener
  • Spiral bound wide ruled notebooks
  • Water-based markers
  • Highlighters
  • Index cards
  • Ruler with English and metric units
  • Slim multi-pocket folders (they need to be able to fit into your desk)
  • Storage box (5" wide x 2" deep for pencils, crayons, erasers, and scissors)
  • Sturdy and supportive backpack
  • Three-ring binder
  • Construction paper
  • Drawing paper
  • Glue stick
  • Scotch tape
  • Stapler
  • Scissors (blunt ends for safety)
  • Watercolors
  • White glue

 

Middle School Students
Writing Utensils Organizational Utensils Study Aids Craft Materials
  • Ballpoint pens - black, blue, and red
  • Classic No. 2 pencils (Many times the fancy ones are not No. 2 and the erasers don't work as well.)
  • Colored pencils
  • Highlighters
  • Large pink eraser
  • Loose-leaf notebook paper
  • Mechanical pencils
  • Pencil sharpener
  • Spiral bound wide ruled notebooks
  • Calendar/planner with notes section to record assignments and schedules
  • Combination lock (It's possible you will need one for your locker and gym locker.)
  • Pencil case that fits inside a binder
  • Printer paper and ink cartridges
  • Ruler with English and metric units
  • Stapler
  • Storage box (5" wide x 2" deep for pencils, crayons, erasers, and scissors
  • Sturdy and supportive backpack
  • Three-ring binders, binder dividers with pockets, and folders that fit inside
  • Three-hole punch
  • Calculators (Check with teacher before investing in an expensive one.)
  • Index cards for homemade flash cards - ruled and unruled
  • Protractor
  • Construction paper
  • Drawing paper
  • Glue sticks
  • Scotch tape
  • Scissors
  • Water-based markers
  • Watercolor paints
  • White glue

 

High School Students
Writing Utensils Organizational Utensils Study Aids Craft Materials
  • Ballpoint pens - black, blue, and red
  • Classic No. 2 pencils (Many times the fancy ones are not No. 2 and the erasers don't work as well.)
  • Colored pencils
  • Graph paper
  • Highlighters
  • Large pink eraser
  • Loose-leaf notebook paper
  • Mechanical pencils
  • Pencil sharpener
  • Spiral bound wide ruled notebooks
  • Calendar/planner with notes section to record assignments and schedules
  • Combination lock (It's possible you will need one for your locker and gym locker.)
  • Pencil case that fits inside a binder
  • Printer paper and ink cartridges
  • Ruler with English and metric units
  • Stapler
  • Storage box (5" wide x 2" deep for pencils, crayons, erasers, and scissors
  • Sturdy and supportive backpack
  • Three-ring binders, binder dividers with pockets, and folders that fit inside
  • Three-hole punch
  • Calculators (Check with teacher before investing in an expensive one.)
  • Flash drive
  • Index cards for homemade flash cards - ruled and unruled
  • Public library card
  • Protractor
  • Construction paper
  • Drawing paper
  • Glue sticks
  • Scotch tape
  • Scissors
  • Water-based markers
  • Watercolor paints
  • White glue

 

College Students
Basics Living Technology
  • Backpack/messenger bag
  • Ballpoint pens - color variety
  • Calendar/planner with notes section to record assignments and schedules
  • Classic No. 2 pencils (Many times the fancy ones are not No. 2 and the erasers don't work as well.)
  • Correction fluid/tape
  • Highlighters in a variety of colors
  • Index cards
  • Notebooks/loose-leaf paper
  • Ruler with English and metric units
  • Stapler
  • Sticky notes and flags (Don't write in your textbooks so you can sell them back to the book store.)
  • Three-hole punch
  • Basic tool set
  • Cleaning wipes
  • Clock radio
  • Drying rack for clothes
  • Desk lamp
  • Hangers
  • Handheld vacuum
  • Laundry detergent, tote and money (quarters or pre-paid laundry card)
  • Over the counter medicine like vitamins, allergy medications, pain relievers
  • Shower shoes, like flip flops
  • Shower tote for toiletries
  • Small refrigerator
  • Water bottles for the walks across campus
  • Laptop
  • Calculators (Check with instructor before investing in an expensive one.)
  • Extension cords
  • Flash drive
  • Headphones
  • Index cards for homemade flash cards - ruled and unruled
  • Internet access - either router, or ethernet cord
  • Power strips
  • Printer
  • Public library card
  • Protractor

 

 


Plan in advance for college

It’s never too early for pre-college students and their families to identify and earmark the financial resources they have available to fund a college education — whether from savings, loans, grants, scholarships, or work income.  

Here are some sources to help you and your parents plan how to finance a higher education:

  • College Savings PlansHills Bank offers several options to help you fund the cost of a higher education. It’s okay to start small, but start now with a college savings plan that both you and your parents can contribute to:    

    • 529 Plan  –  529 Plans are tax-advantaged savings plans designed to encourage saving for future college costs. View more information from the US Securities and Exchange Commission about 529 Plans.
    • US Government EE Savings Bonds  –  EE Bonds are reliable, low-risk government-backed savings products that you can use toward financing education and other special events. These are available through Hills Bank and may also be purchased online through the US Treasury.
    • Coverdell Education Savings Account (CESA) – Parents can start their child’s college fund by opening a CESA to save for higher education.   
  • Student Loans –  Hills Bank offers student loans for both students and parents to cover the cost of undergraduate and graduate school education. These loans have the advantages of a lower interest rate and can be repaid over a longer time period than standard consumer loans. Talk to the financial aid office at your school about paying for your education. They’ll help you obtain any financial aid from college, state, or federal loans. 
      
    • Iowa Student Loan – Hills Bank is pleased to partner with Iowa Student Loan, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping Iowa students and families obtain resources for higher education.
    • Iowa College Access Network® (ICAN) – A free and useful resource to help you plan and apply for college. ICAN’s comprehensive website offers free help with college preparation and selection, financial aid forms, career planning, financial literacy, and college success strategies. Free one-on-one assistance is also available at the ICAN College Planning Center in Cedar Rapids. Call 1-877-272-4692 to make an appointment or speak to an ICAN staff member.
  • Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)  –  All college applicants and their parents or guardians should become familiar with the most recent FAFSA guidelines and deadlines which can be found at  http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/. Applications for federal student aid may also be available
    from your high school counselors, public library, or college financial aid office.
      
  • Other Resources These useful resources will help you plan and apply for college.
    • The College Board – The College Board can help you with free scholarship searches, standardized test preparation, and college selection suggestions.
    • ACT – ACT features standardized test preparation, student blogs, and frequently asked questions.
    • College Navigator – Find schools that are right for you. Search on your own or use the site’s search tools, compare your top choices side by side, use an interactive map, and save your results and search sessions.

Tips for college orientation

Sending a child to college is much like when you watched them take their first steps. You held their hand, but eventually, you let go with excitement and worry that they might fall. If they succeed, you applaud and congratulate. If they fail, you provide encouragement, comfort, and you help them stand back up and walk. You don’t continue to carry them because you know eventually they are going to walk on their own, and the same goes for college.

In order to make sure students and parents get the most from college orientation, parents should anticipate taking a back seat in the process and allow students to take charge. Often times, students and parents are separated during orientation to learn about expectations and how to transition smoothly from high school to college.

During a typical college orientation, you will tour the campus and residence halls, view panel discussions on academic and student life, have small group sessions on topics like financial aid and study abroad, and attend receptions and social events. For many students, it’s a great chance to meet new classmates and become acquainted with the campus. For many parents, it’s a great time to see textbook options, residence hall life, and information your student will need down the road. Take a look around the community to find coffee houses, bakeries, and restaurants. Your student will probably look forward to mail from you with gift cards to local eateries attached. You can also find hotels in the area for your visits and measure the dorm rooms and see what you will need on move-in day.

If possible, get as many logistics handled as possible during orientation. These include items like student ID cards, creating school email and usernames, registering for classes, and setting up new bank accounts in the area. The first couple of weeks can be overwhelming, so it’s best to have as much done before school starts as possible.

Remember, during orientation, EVERYONE is the new person. If your student is feeling shy or not sure of how to approach people, just have them keep in mind, the other students probably feel the same way.

For more resources, contact your college admissions office. They will be able to guide you to resources and let you know what to expect on orientation day, as well as college.


Continue financial literacy throughout your college years

When it comes to financial literacy, the best lessons can be one-on-one education from parents or guardians. As a young adult in college, you are entering the next stage in your life, and possibly out of your parents' home. By acquiring solid financial skills during your college years, you build a foundation of financial knowledge that lasts your entire life. There are many reliable websites available online that can provide great financial support and guidance as you begin building your financial future. A few are included below:

  • CashCourse: CashCourse provides education on a broad range of financial topics to assist young adults to reach their financial goals.
  • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) Money Smart Podcasts: A financial education program including podcasts about checking and savings accounts, budgeting and saving, and credit.
  • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) Quick Tips for Managing Your Money for Youth Adults and Teens: Simple strategies and practical guidance for borrowing, saving, banking, and avoiding scams.
  • iGrad: iGrad seeks to provides an online community for young adults and includes intuitive tools, calculators, games, articles, and online videos.
  • Jump$tart!: Jump$tart strives to improve financial literacy of pre-kindergarten through college-aged youth by providing advocacy, research, standards, and educational resources. Jump$tart's “Reality Check” indicates what is needed once you are on your own.
  • MyMoney.Gov: A U.S. government website dedicated to financial education. There is a “Going to College” section with guides for young adults getting started with their personal finances.
  • The Money Clubhouse: The Money Clubhouse educates young adults by showing how money management can be fun, motivating, and life changing. This site offers a section called “College Cram” for young adults in college.
  • Spendster.org: Spendster strives to create a safe haven for "spenders" to share. You can upload a video showing bad purchases you made, watch video confessions, talk with spenders in an online community, use a Spendster calculator to learn what your money would’ve been worth had you not wasted it on something you didn’t need, and mend your spending.

 


Parents of Students

You will always be their most important teacher. "Treat others as you want to be treated;" "always tell the truth;" and "be smart with money," may be some of the most important lessons your child will learn. Hills Bank would like to be a part of each stage of your life and help you with the financial products and services you need along the way. Below are a few tips for parents of students to help through your child's school years.

School enrollment. Each school district varies, so find out the deadlines for applications, registration, open enrollment, and financial aid as soon as possible. Most school districts have enrollment and registration instructions on their website. Check with your school to make sure you have all the necessary documentation, like birth certificate, immunization records, etc. For more information about Iowa schools, visit EducateIowa.gov, a resource for students and families. 

Have your child's immunizations up-to-date. The State of Iowa law requires all students be immunized against certain diseases or illnesses. Proof of immunizations must be presented to the school, usually within 30 days of enrollment. Contact your school district for more information on immunizations. 

Arrange before/after school care. Communities across the state are working to provide positive, constructive learning activities for before and after school programs. The types of activities and common elements of quality before and after school programs can be found on EducateIowa.gov

Consider parenting classes at your local community college. Unfortunately, children do not come with manuals. As your child develops, there are classes offered at area community colleges that can help you and your family improve parent-child relationships and child development.


Hills Bank Customer Protection Center

Hills Bank has created the Customer Protection Center to provide educational information and ways to protect your accounts and personal information. In this center, you can find up-to-date security alerts from the FDIC and Hills Bank, information on protecting your bank cards, tips for online security and mobile security, information about social media security, a video about identity theft, and a list of online resources to help protect your identity. 

Visit the Customer Protection Center today!


Additional online resources for students and parents

  • AIPL.ARSUSDA.gov: Learn interesting facts about the Department of Agriculture's Animal Improvement Programs Laboratory and play fun games along the way!
  • ARS.USDA.gov: Visit the Agricultural Research Service Sci4Kids website to see images of ag research, science spotlights and projects, and learn about cool careers.  
  • EducateIowa.gov: The Iowa Department of Education website provides information for students, families, and the community to help support students with their education across the state. 
  • FTC.gov: Learn to be a smarter consumer at the Federal Trade Commission's virtual mall where you can play games, design ads, chat with consumers and store owners, plus much more!
  • ICgov.org: Visit the Living Off-Campus page for information to students living off-campus in Iowa City regarding tips on renting and leasing, services offered by Iowa City, and important contact information.
  • ICPL.org: Visit the Iowa City Public Library's Kid Space for reading events, programs, games, and more!
  • IRS.gov: The Internal Revenue Service created this website to help students understand taxes with activities, tax tutorials, simulations, and assessments. 
  • Kids.USA.gov: The official kids' website for the U.S. government to provide a safe place online for kids to create, learn, and play.
  • NewMoney.gov: Design your own bill and play interactive games to learn more about money.
  • NGA.gov: Explore adventures in art from the National Gallery of Art.
  • NationalZoo.SI.edu: Visit the Smithsonian National Zoological Park's Animal Cams to take a virtual visit to the zoo any day of the week!
  • SSA.gov: The Social Security Administration helps explain Social Security in their Kids' Place. 
  • Treasury.gov: Visit the Kids Zone to learn more about the White House, US Mint, Bureau of Engraving and Printing, and more.
  • USMint.gov: H.I.P. Pocket Change has games, cartoons, coins, and history for kids to find out all about the United States Mint.
  • USPTO.gov: The United States Patent and Trademark Office welcomes students and young inventors to visit their website to learn more about patents and trademarks.

 

 


For help determining the best practices and products for sound and productive money management during
your particular life stage, please contact us at any Hills Bank location or email us at hillsbank@hillsbank.com.

 


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